Installation on (existing) Linux System

Discussion in 'LiquidFiles General' started by C.S., Jan 10, 2017.

  1. C.S.

    C.S. New Member

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    We would like to install liquidfiles on a vserver instead of a cloud provider like AWS (because of the huge price difference).
    Sadly with these providers it is not possible to boot the virtual servers with a custom iso file.

    So I would really like a way to install LiquidFiles without having to boot from an ISO.

    Are there any installation instructions for an existing Linux System (e.g. CentOS 7) ?
     
  2. David

    David Administrator
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    Currently LiquidFiles is delivered only as a boxed solution with pre-configured OS (Centos7) distributed on images (ISO, OVF, VHD). If it was delivered as a separate installable package we would not be able warrant its running as it should and easily push LF updates, security updates and patches for dozens of modified Centos each virtual provider offer. Also visa verse, we would not be able to manage and prevent that providers from uninstalling or installing versions of packages or libraries LF need or don't need.

    Cheers

    David
     
  3. ek-dyoder

    ek-dyoder New Member

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    This would be a great feature. Would it be possible to containerize LF so we can run it on pretty much any cloud provider?
     
  4. ek-dyoder

    ek-dyoder New Member

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    On second thought, containerizing LF probably isn't the way to go - while cool, it probably won't do much in the way of helping here.

    @CS - what do you mean you want to run it on a "vserver instead of a cloud provider"? I'm confused. LF has a bunch of different options for either attaching a VHD or booting an AWS machine image to get up and running in a public cloud. But if you aren't running in a public cloud, then you must be running it on-prem. If that's the case, why are you having trouble booting from an ISO?
     

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